Bee Reid

Bee Reid (also known as Corey Drew) is a jewelry artist and metalsmith from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is currently based in Kent, Ohio. They began their metalsmithing career at Edinboro University and received their MFA in Jewelry/ Metals/ Enameling from Kent State University in May 2023. Before attending grad school, Reid co-founded and operated Queerly Collective, a space to center and uplift queer artists. They have exhibited work at New York City Jewelry Week and the Ohio Craft Museum, Columbus, OH, and their work has been featured in Metalsmith magazine. Their work will be featured in an upcoming exhibition at the National Ornamental Metal Museum, Memphis, TN.

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A Thousand Teardrops Can't Be Wrong

Date of Creation: April 4, 2023

List of Materials: Leather, freshwater pearls, sterling silver, silk, mild steel, ribbon, dye

Dimensions: 11 x 7 x 8.5 in

Photographer's Name: Pierce Bartman

Model's Name: Bee Reid

Conceptual Statement: I have mourned many people, most of whom are still alive. Forming and maintaining relationships has always been difficult for me. Relationships end in sudden and unexpected ways, and I carry an immense amount of grief with me. These experiences have led me to create a collection of mourning veils in which I explore my non-linear grieving process of interpersonal relationships. These pieces are heavily influenced by my identity as a fat, neurodivergent, genderqueer dyke. I find it impossible to separate my mourning process from my identities which often leave me alienated and on the outside of my communities. These wearable objects allow me to physically express the emotions I experience internally but struggle to appropriately display. The weight and/ or placement of the pieces make them impossible to ignore, much like the aching pangs of sorrow. Wear A Thousand Teardrops Can’t Be Wrong when overwhelmed and consumed by deep mourning.

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Those Who Have Felt Pain and Those Who Have Yet To

Date of Creation: 01/04/2023

List of Materials: Mild steel, freshwater pearls, sterling silver

Dimensions: 11 x 7 x 8.5 in

Photographer's Name: Pierce Bartman

Model's Name: Bee Reid

Conceptual Statement: I have mourned many people, most of whom are still alive. Forming and maintaining relationships has always been difficult for me. Relationships end in sudden and unexpected ways, and I carry an immense amount of grief with me. These experiences have led me to create a collection of mourning veils in which I explore my non-linear grieving process of interpersonal relationships. These pieces are heavily influenced by my identity as a fat, neurodivergent, genderqueer dyke. I find it impossible to separate my mourning process from my identities which often leave me alienated and on the outside of my communities. These wearable objects allow me to physically express the emotions I experience internally but struggle to appropriately display. The weight and/ or placement of the pieces make them impossible to ignore, much like the aching pangs of sorrow. Wear Those Who Have Felt Pain and Those Who Have Yet To when caught up and weighed down by grief.

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I Can’t Go Back to Who I Was Before I Met You

Date of Creation: 24/03/2023

List of Materials: Freshwater pearls, sterling silver, silk, steel

Dimensions: 18.5 x 7 x 8.5 in

Photographer's Name: Mario Arteaga

Model's Name: Bee Reid

Conceptual Statement: I have mourned many people, most of whom are still alive. Forming and maintaining relationships has always been difficult for me. Relationships end in sudden and unexpected ways, and I carry an immense amount of grief with me. These experiences have led me to create a collection of mourning veils in which I explore my non-linear grieving process of interpersonal relationships. These pieces are heavily influenced by my identity as a fat, neurodivergent, genderqueer dyke. I find it impossible to separate my mourning process from my identities which often leave me alienated and on the outside of my communities. These wearable objects allow me to physically express the emotions I experience internally but struggle to appropriately display. The weight and/ or placement of the pieces make them impossible to ignore, much like the aching pangs of sorrow. Wear I Can’t Go Back to Who I Was Before I Met You to show acceptance of loss and what happened (or when you’re trying really hard to).

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