Catherine Sheedy

Sheedy lives in Lévis, Québec, Canada. Trained in jewelry and metalsmithing during her 3-year diploma at the École de joaillerie de Québec, she has continued her studies in Visual Arts at the Université Laval where she was awarded her master’s degree (MFA) in 2007. Her interest in contemporary jewelry led her to participate in experimental workshops and artist-in-residence programs. She has presented her work in several exhibitions and publications in Canada, the United States, France, Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. She has been the recipient of grants from the Quebec Art Council and the Canada Art Council. She has won prizes, including the Metal Arts Guild of Canada Steel Trophy Award 2013 and the 2017 Jean-Marie Gauvreau Award, the highest distinction given by the Quebec Craft Council. Sheedy’s work his represented by Noel Guyomarc’h Gallery and are part of the collections of the Musée des métiers d’art du Québec(MUMAQ) and the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal(MBAM).

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Chercher sa stabilité 1 (Searching for Stability 1), from the series: Le fleuve porteur d’histoire (River Stories).

Date of Creation: June 9, 2019

List of Materials: Flint stone, sterling silver

Dimensions: 44cm X 8cm X 4cm

Photographer's Name: Jérôme Bourque

Model's Name: Julie Pichette

Conceptual Statement: Fascinated by the impact of humans on landscape transformation, I draw inspiration from the origins of found material, creating jewelry pieces that testify of a site’s history. The stone used to create “Searching for Stability” necklace was found in front of my house, at Lévis (Québec, Canada), on the shore of Saint Lawrence River. Between the XVI and XIX centuries this kind of flint stone was employed as weight to stabilize empty ships from Europe to America. Before returning, with the boat full of goods, the sailors had let the ballast stones there. Inspired by this story, I did an analogy with our constant search to find our own place in this world and the right balance in our life. Placed in the middle of the body, the necklace was for me the most appropriate object to express this intention. Through jewelry, I try to grasp the physical and psychological impact of a portable art.

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S’accrocher au passé 1-2 (Clinging to the Past 1 and 2), from the series: Le fleuve porteur d’histoire (River Stories).

Date of Creation: 18/05/2019

List of Materials: Stainless steel (found and new)

Dimensions: Necklace: 35cm X 15cm X 3cm Brooch: 6,5cm X 8cm X 2cm

Photographer's Name: Jérôme Bourque

Model's Name: Julie Pichette

Conceptual Statement: Fascinated by the impact of humans on landscape transformation, I draw inspiration from the origins of found material, creating jewelry pieces that testify of a site’s history. The necklace and the brooch S’accrocher au passé 1-2 (Clinging to the Past 1 and 2) are made of stainless steel found on the banks of the St. Lawrence River, in Lévis, Québec, Canada. The material comes from the cutting residues of the former stainless steel and aluminum plant L’Hoir (1939-1984). Revealed by the tides, these traces of the past appeared to me as treasures. They help me to remember the story of the land where I grew up and live now. Despite the negative impact of those industrial waste on my surroundings, I feel bound to these artifacts. Through jewelry I try to understand, visually and physically, this dichotomous feeling.

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S’amalgamer au paysage 7 (Merging with the landscape 7), from the series: Le fleuve porteur d’histoire (River Stories).

Date of Creation: 11/06/2019

List of Materials: Sturgeon bone, coal, acrylic resin, plastic, sterling silver.

Dimensions: 11cm X 21cm X 6cm

Photographer's Name: Jérôme Bourque

Model's Name: Julie Pichette

Conceptual Statement: Fascinated by the impact of humans on landscape transformation, I draw inspiration from the origins of found material, creating jewelry pieces that testify of a site’s history. The brooch S’amalgamer au paysage 7 (Merging with the landscape 7) is made of fish bone and residues of coal industries, found on the banks of the St. Lawrence River at Lévis, Québec, Canada. Inspired by the cycle of life of the materials, the black beach sand composed from the disintegration of those matter incited me to coat the bones with the coal. Hiding natural elements with a manmade material is for me a metaphor for the fragility of this ecosystem. Also, the structure of the jewel was determined by playing with the components until I found an evocative organic shape in link with my observations of scavenger birds on the shore. Through jewelry I try to capture the passage of time on the landscape and how this impermanence affects me.

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