Luci Jockel

Luci Jockel is an artist located in Baltimore, MD. She currently holds the position as Metalsmithing and Jewelry Lecturer/Coordinator at Towson University. Luci received her Master of Fine Arts from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in Jewelry and Metalsmithing, 2016, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP), 2014. Recently, Luci has been honored with the 2019 American Craft Council Emerging Voices Award as a Shortlist Artist. Her work has been exhibited at various venues, including the ACC Conference 2019, Schmuck 2018 Munich Fair, New York City Jewelry Week, Society of North American Goldsmiths Conference 2018, and Galerie Marzee’s Marzee International Graduate Show 2016 where she received the Marzee International Graduate Prize. Her work has been featured in “New Brooches” by Nicolas Estrada, Metalsmith’s “Exhibition in Print” 2017, and American Craft Magazine.

Luci-Hives-2.jpg

Hives

Date of Creation: February 1, 2021

List of Materials: honey bee wings, archival glue

Dimensions: .75" x .04" x 14"

Photographer's Name: Luci Jockel

Model's Name: Luci Jockel

Other Contributors: JV Collective (curatorial collaborators) In response to JV Collectives’ Fall 2020 curatorial project In-School Suspension, members of JV Collective dredged up their own feelings of nostalgia and angst for a time in life that is often messy and transformative: High School. Each member reflected on those formative years and the items that once adorned their bodies. This series of work, Homeroom, is a snapshot of adolescence and made its virtual debut during Munich Jewellery Week 2021.

Conceptual Statement: High school was a time of chaos & rebellion. A time of sneaking out, partying, punk shows, and body modifications with the punks, goths and emo kids. My first tattoo was a stick n’ poke given to me by my close friend in the back of a car, resulting in a lopsided star. We stretched our ears as another act of rebellion and as a badge of belonging to the punk/emo scene. Heavy eyeliner, dyed mullets, band tees, skinny jeans, studded belts, tattoos, snake bites, gauges, & chokers were the emo kid’s uniform. Our adornment was armor: it was meant to intimidate or repel, yet beneath that many were suffering. Emo culture embraced mental health awareness but evolved into a trend that made light of what drew those to the subculture in the first place. Within these cliques, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and drug addiction were common. In high school, I had lost three close friends to suicide, and two more to drug overdose. The honey bee wings in my work carry this grief & seek catharsis.

Luci-Hives-3.jpg

Hives

Date of Creation: 01/02/2021

List of Materials: honey bee wings, archival glue

Dimensions: .75" x .04" x 14"

Photographer's Name: Luci Jockel

Model's Name: Luci Jockel

Other Contributors: JV Collective (curatorial collaborators) In response to JV Collectives’ Fall 2020 curatorial project In-School Suspension, members of JV Collective dredged up their own feelings of nostalgia and angst for a time in life that is often messy and transformative: High School. Each member reflected on those formative years and the items that once adorned their bodies. This series of work, Homeroom, is a snapshot of adolescence and made its virtual debut during Munich Jewellery Week 2021.

Conceptual Statement: High school was a time of chaos & rebellion. A time of sneaking out, partying, punk shows, and body modifications with the punks, goths and emo kids. My first tattoo was a stick n’ poke given to me by my close friend in the back of a car, resulting in a lopsided star. We stretched our ears as another act of rebellion and as a badge of belonging to the punk/emo scene. Heavy eyeliner, dyed mullets, band tees, skinny jeans, studded belts, tattoos, snake bites, gauges, & chokers were the emo kid’s uniform. Our adornment was armor: it was meant to intimidate or repel, yet beneath that many were suffering. Emo culture embraced mental health awareness but evolved into a trend that made light of what drew those to the subculture in the first place. Within these cliques, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and drug addiction were common. In high school, I had lost three close friends to suicide, and two more to drug overdose. The honey bee wings in my work carry this grief & seek catharsis.

Luci-Hives-4.jpg

Hives

Date of Creation: 01/02/2021

List of Materials: honey bee wings, archival glue

Dimensions: .75" x .04" x 14"

Photographer's Name: Luci Jockel

Model's Name: Luci Jockel

Other Contributors: JV Collective (curatorial collaborators) In response to JV Collectives’ Fall 2020 curatorial project In-School Suspension, members of JV Collective dredged up their own feelings of nostalgia and angst for a time in life that is often messy and transformative: High School. Each member reflected on those formative years and the items that once adorned their bodies. This series of work, Homeroom, is a snapshot of adolescence and made its virtual debut during Munich Jewellery Week 2021.

Conceptual Statement: High school was a time of chaos & rebellion. A time of sneaking out, partying, punk shows, and body modifications with the punks, goths and emo kids. My first tattoo was a stick n’ poke given to me by my close friend in the back of a car, resulting in a lopsided star. We stretched our ears as another act of rebellion and as a badge of belonging to the punk/emo scene. Heavy eyeliner, dyed mullets, band tees, skinny jeans, studded belts, tattoos, snake bites, gauges, & chokers were the emo kid’s uniform. Our adornment was armor: it was meant to intimidate or repel, yet beneath that many were suffering. Emo culture embraced mental health awareness but evolved into a trend that made light of what drew those to the subculture in the first place. Within these cliques, depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and drug addiction were common. In high school, I had lost three close friends to suicide, and two more to drug overdose. The honey bee wings in my work carry this grief & seek catharsis.

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